"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Abraham Lincoln

Posted on December 20, 2016 by Sioux under General
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A long-time friend in SA has family in the UK and said if ever I wanted to visit the area, I should let her know. I did, so I did. Her cousin lives in Ruyton-XI-Towns, formally Ruyton of the Eleven Towns or simply Ruyton, a large village in Shropshire, on the River Perry.

 

Ruyton-XI-Towns is situated close to the Welsh border, between the Shropshire towns of Shrewsbry and Oswestry and dates back to the Anglo-Saxon period. The village, which frequently changed hands between the Welsh and English armies, got its unusual name in the 12th century when a castle was built, and it became the major manor of eleven local townships. 

 

The Roman numeral for eleven is included in its name, making it the only town in the UK with numerals in its name. Some of the eleven ancient townships, mostly situated to the north and west of Ruyton, still survive as hamlets today; although some are now just a collection of farm buildings.

 

Arthur Conan Doyle, while a medical student, worked as an unpaid

assistant in the village and later recalled Ruyton in his Memories and

Recollections(1923) as “not big enough to make one town, far less

eleven”.

                                                                     In 1308, an attempt was made to rename the town New Ruyton,  but that never happened. The parish church, St John the Baptist Church, is situated in the same grounds as the castle, and dates back to the 12th century. The castle was destroyed in 1202, rebuilt by 1313 and destroyed again by Owain Glyndŵr. Its ruins stand in the parish churchyard.

My host took me on a walk about in the surrounding hills. The stunning scenery lending itself to many photos.

Standing atop the highest peak of the hills, we were able to look into the Welsh countryside.

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Public Houses (commonly just called pubs) are an integral part of British culture. Their origin was back in Roman times when Taverns catered for large numbers of off-duty Roman soldiers or for travelers on the roads.

 

At that time they mostly sold wine as well as food to be consumed on the premises. The Anglo-Saxons were mostly beer drinkers, however, and so the establishments became known as Alehouses. 

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                                                                                                                     The Talbot is a 17th century coaching inn, based

                                                                                                                      in Ruyton-of- X1-Towns. A refurbishment of the inn included

                                                                                                                      the old 15th century Brewhouse where much of the original

                                                                                                                      frames remain intact. The original oak beams have been                                                                            hand restored, stripping layer upon layer of paint which has been covering the building                                                                      since the 18th century. 

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