"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Abraham Lincoln

Posted on January 4, 2017 by Sioux under General
1 Comment

 

My hosts took me for a meal and walk about in Shrewsbury, which is the county town of Shropshire, situated on the River Severn.

It is a market town whose centre has a largely unaltered medieval street plan and over 660 listed buildings, including a number of examples of timber framing from the 15th and 16th centuries.

 

The Shrewsbury Castle, and Shrewsbury Abbey, a former Benedictine

monastery, were founded in 1074 and 1083. 

Charles Darwin was born and brought up in Shrewsbury 

                                                               and there are a number                                                                 of reminders of this                                                                          throughout the town. 

                                                                 This piece of artwork                                                                       was underneath a                                                                           bridge.

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The town suffered very little from the bombing runs in the Second World War that did damage to many English locations, and many of its ancient buildings remain intact. There was also very little redevelopment in the 1960s and 1970s, which possibly destroyed the character of many historic towns in the UK .

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Shrewsbury has a 29-acre parkland known as The Quarry,

which is host to a number of events, including The Carnival, Shrewsbury Regatta and Dragon Boat Racing.

At its centre lies The Dingle, formerly a stone quarry and now a beautiful sunken garden, landscaped with alpine borders, colourful plants, shrubbery and water features. The park was created in 1719 and covers 29 acres. The bandstand was built in 1879. 

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A statue of the goddess Sabrina was presented by the Earl of Bradford in 1879. The inscription on the statue is based on a poem by John Milton (1608–1674). In myth, Sabrina was a nymph who drowned in the Severn.

Shrewsbury School is a co-educational 

private school for pupils aged 13 to 18 and was founded by Royal Charter in 1552. The school over looks the River Severn and The Quarry 

Another feature in the Dingle is the Shoemakers’ Arbour. It dates from 1679 and includes statues of Crispin and Crispinian, the patron saints of shoemakers. Associated with the pre-Victorian town festival, and originally sited in Kingsland, it was moved to the Dingle in 1879.

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The statue of the heroic Hercules, a copy of the Farnese statue in Naples, dates from the early 18th century. 

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There are numerous memorial benches and plaques within the Dingle. According to local legend, the Dingle is haunted by the ghost of Mrs Foxall, a local woman who was burnt at the stake in the 16th century as punishment for witchcraft and murder.  

It stands proudly on the banks of the River Severn, in the Quarry. Hercules once stood opposite St Chad’s Church and it’s thought that the statue had been completely naked at that time. According to local legend, Hercules’ nudity was an embarrassment to the church-going ladies of Shrewsbury, so the fig leaf was added to the statue. But the restoration work discovered that poor Hercules never had the necessary equipment, and had always been covered up.  

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St Chad’s Church, Shrewsbury occupies a prominent position in the

county town of Shropshire. The current church building was built in 1792, and with its distinctive round shape and high tower it is a well-known landmark in the town. It faces The Quarry area of parkland, which slopes down to the River Severn. Charles Darwin was baptised in St Chad’s church in 1809. 

Porthill Suspension Bridge, also often referred to as Port Hill Footbridge, is a suspension bridge for pedestrians crossing the River Severn. It connects Porthill with the Quarry and the town centre. The bridge experiences significant vibration, even when few people are crossing it. A ferry operated here until the bridge was built in 1922.

 

One response to “Shropshire #3: Shrewsbury & The Dingle”

  1. Cathi says:

    How stunning scooch!!

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