"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Abraham Lincoln

Posted on May 14, 2018 by Sioux under General
1 Comment

 

My niece and I only had 2 days free in Liverpool after the shoot and as she hadn’t been there before, we took the opportunity of the clear weather to explore as much as we could. I had done some pre-niece-arrival exploring on my own; and once we had done the photo shot of the little one, we headed out to the city centre, Mathew Street & the dockside. A fab weekend in my favourite city before saying our farewells and each heading in different directions to home and work.

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St Luke’s church was designed in 1802, and redesigned and built by his son in 1831. After being damaged in WW2 the building was purchased by the city and repaired.  

Liverpool is home to the oldest Chinese community in Europe, and is also home to the largest Chinese arch outside of China. The Imperial Arch stands at 13.5m tall and is one of Liverpool’s most spectacular sites. Detailed on the arch are 200 dragons and five roofs. The arch was a gift from Shanghai, a city twinned with Liverpool and was shipped over, piece by piece. Assembled in 2000, it was erected in time for the annual Chinese New Year celebrations held in Liverpool’s Chinatown. The arch is protected by two bronze lions, which have been correctly according to the principles of Feng Shui.  

Superlambananas are sculptures intended to be a cross between a banana and a lamb. The sculpture is both a comment on the dangers of genetic engineering and also heavily influenced by the history of Liverpool as historically both sheep and bananas were common cargoes in the city’s docks.

 

Created for the ArtTransPennine Exhibition in 1998, part of an initiative to create a ‘corridor of art’ through the North of England. In 2008, as part of Liverpool’s year-long position as European Capital of Culture, 125 individually designed miniature replicas were created. Sponsored by local community organisations and businesses in the city, the mini Superlambananas were located throughout the Liverpool and Merseyside region.

 

At the end of their ten-week run, the mini Superlambananas were auctioned off for the Lord Mayor’s charities. In 2010, eight new two-metre-high replicas of Superlambanana, known as the “Eight for 08” were commissioned as permanent pieces of public art. 

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The site of St George’s Hall was formerly occupied by the first Liverpool Infirmary  from 1749 to 1824. Construction of the Neo-classical style building started in 1841 and was completed in 1854. It has been said that the hall is one of the finest neo-Grecian buildings in the world.

 

In 2005 it was recognised historically as being the world’s first air-conditioned building, due to a unique heating and ventilation system in the basement. Air was warmed by five hot water pipes which were heated by two coke-fired boilers and two steam boilers, and then circulated by four 3m wide fans. It was controlled by a large number of workers opening and closing a series of canvas flaps. 

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                                                                    Radio City Tower is a radio and observation tower in

                                                                    Liverpool. Built in 1969, it is 138m tall, and is the 32nd

                                                                    tallest in the United Kingdom. Although its considered

to be the second tallest free-standing building in Liverpool, it must be noted that there is a 10m

long antenna on the roof, making it in reality, the tallest structure in Liverpool. Near the top of the

tower was a revolving restaurant, the facade and floor of the restaurant revolving as one unit,

while the roof of the restaurant was used as an observation platform for visitors. There are 558

stairs up to the top, and two lift shafts which reach the top in 30 seconds.

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Mathew Street in Liverpool is best-known worldwide as the location of the

Cavern Club, where The Beatles played on numerous occasions in their early

career. The area known as ‘The Cavern Precinct’ is visited by thousands of tourists every year, to visit the Cavern

Club and many surrounding attractions including a statue of John Lennon, a Beatles store and several pubs formerly

frequented by The Beatles. Buskers make a living entertaining passers-by in the streets around the Cavern Precinct.   

Chilling with Cilla Black

Hanging out with John Lennon

From Mathew Street, we strolled around the Albert and Salthouse Docks for a while; watched the sunset and headed back to the flat. A great day out!

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The restored Wapping Arch is part of original warehousing which stood on the waterfront site and is now dedicated to leisure and residential use. 

The weather on our last day in Liverpool wasn’t great so we walked into town via Birkenhead Park, which wasn’t too far from where we stayed. Originally opened in 1847 the park is acknowledged as the first publicly funded civic park in the world. 

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The Grand Entrance was built to look like a classical triumphal arch.

 

During WW1, part of the park was used as a training ground by the 3rd Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment. The area was damaged by bombs in WW2 and even had a Spitfire use the wide open spaces for a crash landing! 

 

It is now a popular area in the summer for picnics; joggers, dog walkers and concerts, and well used even in the cold winter months as a place to let the dogs and children get rid of their energy! 

 

A fab weekend in my favourite city before saying our farewells and each heading in different directions to home and work.

“The Boathouse”, alongside the park’s lake.

 

One response to “Play date in the city!”

  1. Paul says:

    You certainly had better weather, than when I was there.

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